Tattoo Concealer

Friday June 15th, 2012 @ 7:23 PM

Filed under: Tattoos

Hi! While I’m sure most questions you get are from people who want to show off their modifications, mine is a bit different. I happen to have a very conservative mother. When my mom found out about my first tattoo, she cried and told me she would cut me off if I got another one. Well, I have decided to tempt fate and get my second one (a trail of paper cranes partially up my thigh). However, I just accepted a job that requires me to move home for a month before I can move for work. I would be getting the tattoo about a week before I moved home. Since the tattoo would still be healing, is that too soon to apply a concealer to it? Also, aside from Dermablend, is there another concealer that you would recommend? Thank you!

As I’m sure your tattoo artist will tell you as well, DO NOT put concealer on your fresh healing tattoo.

I am only familiar with Dermablend but I’m sure there are competing products on the market. I would suggest going into a cosmetics store like Sephora as I know they carry these products and can give better advice than I can for application and use.

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Posted by Ryan Mills | Permalink | 1 Comment

white ink in Dallas

Saturday May 26th, 2012 @ 4:44 PM

Filed under: Tattoos

I’m wanting to get a white ink tattoo. With all the research I’ve done on them, I know I need to go to an artist that has done at least a few of these successfully. Any suggestions in Dallas? Short of calling different places and flat out asking, this was the best way I know of at least getting a starting point in the right direction.


It just so happens I work and run a shop here in Dallas and I have some very talented artists working here. DFW has a ton of talented artists to choose from and if I had to pick a few I would recommend my shop Eastside Tattoo of course. Suffer city has some amazing artists as does Hold Fast and Last Angels. Hope that helps point you in the right direction.

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Posted by Ryan Mills | Permalink | Comments

Remove or cover a brand?

Wednesday May 23rd, 2012 @ 7:45 AM

Filed under: Branding, Tattoos

A friend of mine got branded very early in what is now a failed relationship. She wants to be rid of it in some fashion. Here is the situation.

The brand is a letter, about 4″ high by 2.5″ wide. It is a keloid about a half inch across, raised about an 1/8″. It s just a year old. It still itches every day.

She wants a covering tattoo yesterday at the latest. One concern I have is that if it is itching, it is still healing and not yet completely stable. I have seen some folks say wait a year, others say two years.

Also, I am encouraging her to consult with a plastic surgeon to see if it might be at least reduced. Any thoughts on keloid reduction/elimination? She has an older keloid that she finally gave up on and tatted over. She is happy with that result.

Any insights would be much appreciated.

That’s a very difficult call without a picture of the branding and the exact extent of the scar tissue. I would most likely suggest that they seek a doctor who can administer steroid injections to reduce the raised effect of the scar before getting it tattooed.

Alternatively they can also massage pure vitamin E oil into the area as a daily routine to soften up the raised tissue and return it to a more normal colour.

Itching the scar will also make the situation worse as it will just make the scar raise and itch even more!

I think perhaps the first step would be to chat to the prospective tattoo artist first and see what they think about the design choice, placement and height of the scar. Many experienced artists will be able to work around nearly any kind of scar to give a lovely end result.

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Posted by Joeltron | Permalink | Comments

Raised skin

Wednesday May 16th, 2012 @ 1:56 AM

Filed under: Tattoos

I have had my tattoo for over a year and a half now. It is on my right foot. the heart part of it is still raised. when my skin gets super dry i feel like it contracts and my skin burns where the tattoo is still raised. So i put lots of lotion on it and then the next day it feels sort of scabby is there something wrong with it should i do something about it? should i be concerned?

When a tattoo is done, the skin is ‘opened’ and the ink is put in. The end result of this is the tattoo pigment healing under the skin, however it also results in a small amount of scar tissue to form. When a tattoo is done ‘too deep’ or over worked, often this scar tissue will be more than normal and can often cause the lines to appear blurry or blown-out.

As with any scar tissue, it will often raise when you are warm and can often become itchy too. Make sure that you aren’t scratching or irritating it, to relieve the itchyness. This will often ‘open up’ the skin and cause it to become scabby and irritated for a few days.

You could also try massaging the raised bit with pure vitamin E oil, to try and soften the scar tissue and allow it to slowly turn back to ‘normal’.

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Posted by Joeltron | Permalink | Comments

Tattoo irritation

Wednesday May 16th, 2012 @ 1:33 AM

Filed under: Tattoos

This tattoo was done in Jan of this year 2011 and is well healed by now but I’ve noticed whenever I’m in the shower and it’s in contact with hot water or steam it gets irritated and the lines raise and it becomes very itchy. The artist who did it wasn’t he best and I have a blowout from it now so could that be something to do with it?

I have another tattoo done about a month ago and there’s no such reaction.

I just want to know what this is caused by and should I be worried about it.

Thanks :D

When a tattoo is done, the skin is ‘opened’ and the ink is put in. The end result of this is the tattoo pigment healing under the skin, however it also results in a small amount of scar tissue to form. When a tattoo is done ‘too deep’ or over worked, often this scar tissue will be more than normal and can often cause the lines to appear blurry or blown-out.

As with any scar tissue, it will often raise when you are warm and can often become itchy too. You could try rubbing pure vitamin E oil onto the area to soften the scar tissue up, but most importantly make sure you don’t scratch it or it will often just get worse.

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Posted by Joeltron | Permalink | Comments

White Ink Tattoo

Wednesday May 16th, 2012 @ 1:00 AM

Filed under: Tattoos

I’m extremely interested in getting a fully white ink tattoo–just some simple writing–but I’ve read about the consequences of not having a good artist that has extensively worked with white ink. I was curious if anyone could help me out with finding a good artist in the New Jersey (preferably), New York, or Pennsylvania areas? I don’t mind about the cost, simply the quality.

Coming from someone with quite a lot of white work, the main thing that I would suggest to do is to keep the design as simple as you can. Make sure that you get an artist that has experience with white line-work (or lettering) so that they know to use disposable tubes and don’t discolour the ink.

I suggest to first call into a couple studios and ask to see the artists white-work portfolio pictures, if they don’t have any - simply ask them if they know of any other artists near by that do.

You can also start your search using our official BME artist directory.

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Posted by Joeltron | Permalink | Comments

script name?

Wednesday May 16th, 2012 @ 12:57 AM

Filed under: Tattoos

quick one people. Did someone know the name of this script?

As a font connoisseur, this looks like an artist redrawn version of Jellyka Castle’s Queen font.

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Posted by Joeltron | Permalink | Comments

Chinese Translation

Saturday May 12th, 2012 @ 3:17 PM

Filed under: Tattoos

I’m looking for a good place for english -> traditional chinese translation for a tattoo.

I want both inside forearms filled with hanzis (chinese ideograms) that would go like:

forearm 1: “Know yourself, be yourself, love yourself”

forearm 2: “Can you give as much as you can take”

Not sure where to ask for this but since I’ve seen so many great hanji/kanji tattoos here, I thought I’d ask, nothing to lose !

Thanks !! :)


Find yourself someone who actually writes and speaks the language, Then find yourself another person that can confirm what has been written for you.

If you live near a college or university there is usually a language studies program with professors and students that might be able to help you out.

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Posted by Ryan Mills | Permalink | Comments

Finding a tattoo artist

Saturday May 12th, 2012 @ 4:07 AM

Filed under: Tattoos

Looking to get this done when i return stateside. Didnt see any specific examples in the categories on the site so wondering if anyone has any suggestions of artists who are good at this type of thing. this is just an idea im making it my own using photoshop. but here in israel the average i was getting price wise is $400+. That and the quality you can get from most artists is not that good. So if someone could give me an estimate and suggestions of artists in north/central new jersey or new york who you would reccomend i would greatly appreciate it

We can’t really give quotes through BME, as we are a community site and not a tattoo studio.

I would suggest to check out a couple local studios, specifically asking them for artists that do lots of smooth black and grey work. Ask to see their portfolios and make sure you are 100% happy with their work.

Next step would be to give them a large print off of your design and tell them they can make any alterations they need to, to make it more tattooable. Personally I would suggest to make the skull bigger (to get all the detail in) and either simplify or open up the background, to really let the foreground stand out more. Trust in your artist and take their word as gospel.

If you came into my studio and asked for this, I would suggest it around A4 size to ensure that it looks fantastic and won’t fade - however different artists may feel comfortable doing it smaller (and simpler) or may want to do it bigger.

If you are looking for a list of local studios, check out our own searchable Artist Directory 411.bmezine!

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Posted by Joeltron | Permalink | Comments

Discreet, fairly small mermaid tattoo

Saturday May 12th, 2012 @ 4:07 AM

Filed under: Tattoos

Hi everyone.

I’m a complete newbie to tattoos, I’ve never had one and neither have any of my close friends or family.

Basically, I would like a small to medium sized mermaid tattoo, something coloured, fairly detailed, with maybe a fish or anchor alongside it.

Although I’m not too worried about the design element as I’m fairly artistic and I’m sure I could get the idea across to the artist, I’m worried that I’m being over ambitious about getting a small-ish tattoo that will be detailed and coloured. I’ve heard it’s a bad idea to get a small tattoo if it’s detailed.

I’d prefer it detailed and wouldn’t mind getting it slightly bigger to accommodate the detail but my main question is - where should I get it? It needs to be fairly discreet as I’m planning on having a job where a professional appearance is mandatory (although tattoos are beautiful and should be accepted I’m well aware that there are many employers who are against them.)

I’m only 21 and intend on having children so I know that the breasts, stomach, hip and butt are totally out. I don’t really want to get it on the shoulder blade (although as a last resort I would - just trying to minimise my options here) as I wear a lot of tank tops (vest tops) and I think it would look crappy half covered… I’m very tempted by the centre of the back (as in either the top between the shoulder blades or the bottom of the back). Before anyone yells “TRAMP STAMP” I don’t give a shit, people can think whatever they want.

Does anyone have any advice?

I would very strongly recommend to find an artist that specializes in high detailed work and take their advice to the letter when it comes to size. Doing any tattoo too small will loose detail over time, however when it comes to little details in the face - bigger is ALWAYS better.

As far as placement goes, most artists will recommend a high detail piece on a ‘flat’ piece of skin. Should blade back of the leg are both good spots that you can also easily hide. Ribs also could be an option, however many artists suggest against it for smaller detailed pieces as the tissue is difficult to work and it will distort more with your bodies natural movements.

Your best bet would be to shop around and find a good reputable high detailed specialist in your area, make sure you check out their work first and be certain that you are 100% confident in their ability to do the piece how you want. Often if you ask for a ‘portraiture artist’ you will be in good hands as they will be able to pull off the high detail required in the piece, especially in the mermaid’s face.

You can always start your search using our 411.BME artist directory for your area.

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Posted by Joeltron | Permalink | Comments

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